+91-11-49931863   info@toxicslink.org

NonylphenolDirty Trail Detergent to Water Bodies

TitleNonylphenolDirty Trail Detergent to Water Bodies
Publication Type Research Reports
Year of Publication2019
KeywordstoxicindiaStudyDetergentsEnvironmentSoilchemicalToxics LinkRajasthanBloodclothesbreast milkAndhra PradeshnonylphenolYoung childrenGujaratdetergentcarcinogenicsurfactantDirty Trailhealth hazardsendocrine disrupting chemicalcost effectivenesslaundry productsUNEPresearch studies healthfetusbioaccumulative chemicalhormonesurface waterdrinking watercrops consumer productsurineBandiGarh GangaKrishnanTaptiUttar Pradesh
Abstract

Toxics Link has released a new study titled “Dirty Trail: Detergent to Water Bodies” today to assess the presence of the chemical Nonylphenol in Indian water bodies and detergents commonly used in the country. This is the first-of-its-kind study conducted in India which brings out the presence of NP in detergents and water bodies and its subsequent health hazards to the forefront. 

Nonylphenol (NP) is an endocrine disrupting chemical commonly used in the production of Nonylphenol Ethoxylates (NPE) which is used to manufacture detergents. NPE due to its amphipathic property, cost effectiveness and high performance is considered as a workhorse surfactant. Initially the chemical was largely used in the laundry products and was subsequently commercialized for other uses.

The UNEP has identified this chemical as the chemical of global concern and the research studies have confirmed that Nonylphenol is highly toxic to aquatic life and health of the developing fetus and young children.

NP is a persistent, toxic, bioaccumulative chemical which acts as a hormone disruptor and can be responsible for a number of adverse human health effects. Due to its extensive usage, it is now being widely found in surface water, drinking water, soil, crops and even consumer products such as clothes. This ubiquitous presence raises serious health hazards to aquatic life such as fish feminization and to human health as it is detected in blood, urine, breast milk and even amniotic fluid. Concerns are now being raised on its potential to have carcinogenic effects.

Citation key1654
Download URL

Subscribe to our Newsletter